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Mote Marine Lab & Aquarium
@motemarinelab

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Mote Marine Lab has been a leader in marine research since it was founded in 1955. Today, we incorporate public outreach as a key part of our mission.

Mote Marine Lab & Aquarium Mote has been monitoring this ongoing red tide event since October 201

Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium

  • 16.08.2018 01:31
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Mote has been monitoring this ongoing red tide event since October 2017. We understand the importance in keeping the public updated and providing accessible informational resources. For more information on this important issue, check out our website (mote.org) and these resources: -To report fish kills, contact the FWC Fish Kill Hotline at 800-636-0511 or submit a report online. -FWC’s statewide red tide status reports (on abundance of K. brevis algae) are typically updated every Friday afternoon: myfwc.com/redtidestatus -Based on statewide results, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration provides forecasts of potential respiratory irritation: http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/hab/ -Mote’s CSIC app allows users to report when and where they experience respiratory irritation or see discolored water or dead fish — all potential indications of Florida red tide. Motecsic.org -Mote’s Beach Conditions Reporting System provides shoreline observations as often as twice daily: visitbeaches.org -Red tide and human health – information and rack cards from Florida Department of Health: floridahealth.gov/environmental-health/aquatic-toxins/red-tide.html -FWC-Mote Facebook page, Florida Red Tide and Other Harmful Algal Blooms: facebook.com/flhabs -FWC/USF Collaboration for the Prediction of Red Tides (CPR): https://bit.ly/2JTw5oc -NOAA Harmful Algal Bloom Operational Forecast System (HAB-OFS): https://bit.ly/2JXZ6z4

Mote Marine Lab & Aquarium In continuation with red tide research and efforts, Mote Marine Labora

Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium

  • 14.08.2018 23:00
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In continuation with red tide research and efforts, Mote Marine Laboratory scientists have been field-testing a newly developed method for mitigating Florida red tide. Our ozone treatment system was developed and patented, and is currently used, to remove Florida red tide (Karenia brevis) cells and toxins from seawater entering Mote Aquarium and Mote’s animal hospitals on City Island, Sarasota. Mote scientists have adapted this technology for restoring red tide-contaminated, dead-end canals and small embayments by oxidizing (destroying) the red tide cells, toxins and excessive organic matter, and re-oxygenating the water while releasing no ozone into the environment. Mote scientists are currently preforming a canal test in Boca Grande, that involves two ozone systems working together to process 300 gallons of water per minute. Mote staff began this test Aug. 13, with ozonation lasting three to four days, while continuously monitoring water quality both during and after the ozonation, as late as Aug. 18. Monitoring will assess the concentration of K. brevis red tide algae cells, toxins they produce, nutrients, temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH (scale of acidity to alkalinity). Mote is committed to understanding how Florida red tide blooms form, persist and dissipate, how they affect human and animal populations and whether bloom impacts can be controlled or mitigated without adding additional stress to our critical ecosystems. (📸: @flfisherman12)

Mote Marine Lab & Aquarium What are some hints for visiting beaches during Florida red tides?Ch

Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium

  • 13.08.2018 18:13
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What are some hints for visiting beaches during Florida red tides? Check the marine forecast, fewer red tide toxins will be in the air with offshore winds and check Mote's Beach Conditions Reporting for conditions at the beach you plan to visit. visitbeaches.org The Beach Conditions Report provides several types of information about Southwest Florida beaches during red tide events: whether dead fish are present, whether there is respiratory irritation among beachgoers, what the water color is, the wind direction and what flags are currently flying at the beaches (for lifeguard-monitored beaches). For conditions throughout the Florida Gulf coast, with information about cell concentrations observed at specific locations visit myfwc.com/redtidestatus and NOAA provides forecasts of potential respiratory irritation: http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/hab/ #motemarinelab

Mote Marine Lab & Aquarium Be sure to tune in to our 3 pm forum to hear from our scientists regar

Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium

  • 10.08.2018 21:50
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Be sure to tune in to our 3 pm forum to hear from our scientists regarding red tide and what Mote is doing. If you can’t tune in today, it’ll be up on our YouTube channel as soon as we’re able. Today’s Forum Scientists, L to R: Gretchen Lovewell, Program Manager for Mote’s Stranding Investigations Dr. Rich Pierce, Senior Scientist and Program Manager for Ecotoxicology Research Dr. Tracy Fanara, Staff Scientist and Program Manager for Environmental Health Dr. Vince Lovko, Staff Scientist and Program Manager for Phytoplankton Ecology Hayley Rutger, Content Development and today’s moderator

Mote Marine Lab & Aquarium UPDATE: From the evening of Aug. 7 through today, Aug. 9, Mote's Stran

Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium

  • 09.08.2018 21:25
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UPDATE: From the evening of Aug. 7 through today, Aug. 9, Mote's Stranding Investigations Program has recovered nine deceased bottlenose dolphins in Sarasota County, Florida. They recovered two dolphins the night of Aug. 7 on a Gulf of Mexico beach in Venice, Florida. The morning of Aug. 8, they received reports of two more deceased dolphins, and one was recovered from the Intracoastal Waterway near Snake Island in Venice and the other was recovered from Caspersen Beach. The afternoon of Aug. 8, a fifth dolphin was reported along North Casey Key Road in Nokomis, and a sixth was reported floating off mid-Casey Key, and both were transported to Mote. During the night of Aug. 8 into early morning of Aug. 9, Mote staff and volunteers worked to recover a seventh dolphin reported on Siesta Key. On the morning of Aug. 9, the eighth and ninth dolphin were reported on Siesta and Casey Key, respectively, and they are being transported to Mote today. We have alerted our partners in the national-level Marine Mammal Stranding Network overseen by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of all response efforts. Mote staff are conducting or will conduct necropsies on all nine dolphins at Mote's main campus on City Island, Sarasota, to investigate cause of death. Colleagues from FWC and Clearwater Marine Aquarium are assisting with response and necropsies, lending equipment and trained personnel to assist Mote staff. The Sarasota Dolphin Research Program (a Chicago Zoological Society Program in collaboration with Mote) has also been assisting with recoveries, necropsies, and identifications of the dolphins, and colleagues from the University of Florida are on their way to assist as well. Beyond recoveries of deceased dolphins, Mote’s Stranding Investigations Program has recovered dead or rescued alive 145 sea turtles so far in 2018, and has assisted FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute with several manatee recoveries (FWC is the lead on manatee rescue and recovery). #motesip (📸: @flfisherman12)

Mote Marine Lab & Aquarium Sea turtles that hatch and leave our beaches undertake a

Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium

  • 09.08.2018 02:06
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Sea turtles that hatch and leave our beaches undertake a "swim frenzy" that propels them relatively far offshore, and during this process they are nourished by their yolk sac and aren't feeding in the environment (feeding on red tide-contaminated food is believed to be a significant reason why our juvenile and subadult sea turtles in the area can be exposed to the toxins.) On Monday, August 6, Mote took dozens of hatchlings out and released them at the Sargassum weed line, which provides shelter for these hatchlings as well as a mode of transportation. This line is way offshore, past the red tide blooms, ensuring that these hatchings are not released into red tide waters. These hatchlings were cared for in the Kukanza Family Hatchling Hospital at Mote under our staff experts care. We're happy these hatchlings are safe and healthy enough to continue on their journey in the deep blue! (📸: @flfisherman12)

Mote Marine Lab & Aquarium Mote's Stranding Investigations Program had a busy night and morning:

  • 08.08.2018 18:31
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Mote's Stranding Investigations Program had a busy night and morning: Last night (Aug. 7) they recovered two deceased bottlenose dolphins on a Gulf of Mexico beach in Venice, Florida. This morning, they received reports of two more deceased dolphins. One was recovered from the Intracoastal Waterway near Snake Island in Venice and the other is being recovered today from Caspersen Beach. Two are males, one is female, and the fourth animal's sex is not yet known. We have alerted our partners in the national-level Marine Mammal Stranding Network overseen by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Mote staff will conduct necropsies (animal autopsies) on all four dolphins at our campus on City Island, Sarasota, to investigate what happened to them. All four were found moderately to severely decomposed, complicating our efforts to examine and collect samples for analyses, but we are dedicated to learning all we can and sharing that knowledge for the benefit of dolphin populations. We couldn't have recovered these animals without help from those who reported them, and in some cases, assisted us on the scene. For example, Venice Marine Patrol officers did an amazing job finding the third and fourth dolphins and towing them to shore, where colleagues from West Coast Inland Navigation District met them to deliver the animals to Mote, allowing our team to start working on the two from last night.

Mote Marine Lab & Aquarium Today Gretchen Lovewell, Rebeccah Hazelkorn and their team in Mote’s

Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium

  • 07.08.2018 22:55
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Today Gretchen Lovewell, Rebeccah Hazelkorn and their team in Mote’s Stranding Investigations Program conducted a necropsy on a deceased Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle recovered Monday from Siesta Key. It was found in an area with Florida red tide, and with no other visible evidence for why it died, red tide exposure is suspected. “It’s sad to find one of these endangered turtles deceased, and when we do, we put on our science hats and learn as much as we can, to make sure it didn’t die in vain. We found out that this turtle is female, and by examining its GI tract we found it had been eating fish as well as the crabs we often see in Kemp’s ridleys. Sea turtles are known to be exposed to red tide toxins through their food, and we are wondering if that happened to this animal. We have taken samples - lung, kidney, stomach, for example - to prepare them for analysis at another lab to check for possible red tide exposure.” The team has been quite busy, with 137 sea turtles recovered this year and most of those found deceased. Beyond suspected red tide exposure, human interactions such as boat strikes and fishing gear entanglements played another significant role in these mortalities. If you see a sick, injured or dead sea turtle or marine mammal anywhere in Florida, call the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission at: tel:888-404-FWCC In Sarasota and Manatee counties, call Mote’s Stranding Investigations Program at tel:941-988-0212. #motesip #motemarinelab

Mote Marine Lab & Aquarium For months, several southwest Florida communities have been experienci

Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium

  • 03.08.2018 21:01
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For months, several southwest Florida communities have been experiencing effects from elevated concentrations of the Florida red tide algae, Karenia brevis. Communities affected by the current Florida red tide are asking great questions — in particular, what more can be done to address this challenging harmful algal bloom (HAB) and better protect public health and quality of life? Mote Marine Laboratory is working hard to answer that question with multiple scientific studies advancing this summer. Learn more about red tide and what Mote is doing: https://bit.ly/2MgYB4Y

Mote Marine Lab & Aquarium There is so much to learn about our oceans, regardless of our age. The

Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium

  • 01.08.2018 19:56
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There is so much to learn about our oceans, regardless of our age. The world is constantly changing and evolving, allowing for new and educational experiences throughout our lifetimes. Through Mote's Endless Oceans program, adults 18 years and older are able to explore the wonders of our oceans through unique hands-on experiences. To sign up or check out more information, visit us at mote.org/endlessoceans #motemarinelab #moteeducation

Mote Marine Lab & Aquarium Feeling crabby this Monday? Well, don’t pick a fight with this guy!

Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium

  • 30.07.2018 19:03
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Feeling crabby this Monday? Well, don’t pick a fight with this guy! Stone crab claws can crush up to 19,000 lbs per square inch! Compare this to the bite force of a crocodile, and you have about 4 times more force than a croc jaw! I guess size really can be deceiving, huh? #motemarinelab #stonecrab #lovefl

Mote Marine Lab & Aquarium Happy Friday! Mote Marine Laboratory scientists tagged an adult male l

Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium

  • 28.07.2018 01:19
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Happy Friday! Mote Marine Laboratory scientists tagged an adult male loggerhead sea turtle nicknamed “Intrepid” with a satellite transmitter and released him this morning from Lido Beach. Another successful release! We’re happy you’re home, Intrepid! 🐢 https://bit.ly/2NPzCpO

Mote Marine Lab & Aquarium Join us tomorrow, Wednesday, July 25, for our first official day of Sh

Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium

  • 25.07.2018 02:53
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Join us tomorrow, Wednesday, July 25, for our first official day of Shark Days at Mote! At 12:00 p.m. sharp, Dr. Bob Hueter, along with experts from OCEARCH, will be hosting a two-way livestream discussing shark research and behavior. Participants will have the opportunity to learn about the importance of sharks in our ecosystems, as well as ask our experts direct questions regarding shark research and technology. To sign up for this interactive event, follow the link below! http://bit.ly/2mD46Qm

Mote Marine Lab & Aquarium Gazpacho is back home! Mote's Sea Turtle Rehabilitation Hospital staff

Anna Maria Island Beaches

  • 21.07.2018 03:48
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Gazpacho is back home! Mote's Sea Turtle Rehabilitation Hospital staff released a subadult Kemp's ridley turtle on Friday, July 13, who was found entangled in a clump of fishing line with a rod attached. This release was especially important because Kemp's ridleys are federally designated as endangered. Swim safe, buddy! http://bit.ly/2mrhzL3

Mote Marine Lab & Aquarium A new species of shark was discovered and named Squalus clarkae, in ho

Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium

  • 19.07.2018 16:22
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A new species of shark was discovered and named Squalus clarkae, in honor of Mote's founder, Dr. Eugenie Clark, fondly labeled the "Shark Lady". This name is also known as Genie's Dogfish, which was identified from the Gulf of Mexico and western Atlantic Ocean. We are truly touched that Genie is continually recognized for her passion for sharks and dedication to ocean conservation. 🦈 (📸: MarAlliance) http://bit.ly/2JClde2 #motemarinelab #eugenieclark

Mote Marine Lab & Aquarium When it comes to preserving our oceans, one of the most crucial compon

Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium

  • 18.07.2018 01:38
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When it comes to preserving our oceans, one of the most crucial components is studying the marine life that inhabits it. Mote's Stranding Investigations Program (SIP) does just that. They are dedicated to the response of stranded whales, dolphins and sea turtles that may be in distress. In the case of a deceased animal, the goal is to determine why these specific keystone species died by performing a detailed post-mortem examination. Over 1,000 turtles have been recovered since 2003, which has helped shape how we view the ocean today. #motesip

Mote Marine Lab & Aquarium #MondayMood...do you ever want to curl up and hide until Friday? This

Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium

  • 16.07.2018 22:29
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#MondayMood...do you ever want to curl up and hide until Friday? This guy sure does! Octopuses are invertebrates, meaning they have no backbone. In fact, they lack the presence of bones all together, which makes hiding from the Monday blues much easier. 🐙 #motemarinelab #octopus

Mote Marine Lab & Aquarium Happy Shark and Ray Awareness Day! Worldwide efforts to help sharks an

  • 14.07.2018 17:50
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Happy Shark and Ray Awareness Day! Worldwide efforts to help sharks and rays are already paying off! Science-based management in the US and Australia is moving fisheries towards sustainability and conservation. Help educate your friends and family on these misunderstood creatures, and come visit Mote to support marine conservation efforts! #motemarinelab #IAMSHARK www.mote.org