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TIME Former President @barackobama's response on Twitter to the deadly week

  • 16.08.2017 16:33
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Former President @barackobama's response on Twitter to the deadly weekend unrest in #Charlottesville has become the platform's most liked tweet ever. The first in a series of three tweets on Aug. 12, when clashes erupted between white supremacists, neo-Nazis and counterprotesters in the Virginia college town, included an image by @petesouza of Obama smiling at four children in a window and a quote by Nelson Mandela: "No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion."⠀ ⠀ By early Wednesday morning, the tweet had garnered more than 3.2 million Likes and nearly 1.3 million Retweets. Obama's message came hours after President Trump delivered widely panned remarks that condemned violence "on many sides."⠀ ⠀ Photograph by @petesouza—The White House

TIME A firefighting helicopter drops water on a blaze east of Athens on Aug

  • 16.08.2017 14:03
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A firefighting helicopter drops water on a blaze east of Athens on Aug. 15, 2017. The Greek army was called in to assist firefighters around Kalamos, 30 miles (45 kilometers) east of Athens, where a fire has been burning since Aug. 13. In all, 146 fires have broken out across Greece since then, according to authorities.⠀ ⠀ Photograph by Aris Messinis (@aris.messinis)—@afpphoto/@gettyimages

TIME A woman at the beach. A long-distance runner. A girl on roller blades.

  • 16.08.2017 05:29
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A woman at the beach. A long-distance runner. A girl on roller blades. These aren't frequently the subjects in imagery from North Korea, the reclusive state known for its mass military parades, surreal propaganda and 33-year-old dictator Kim Jong Un. But after AFP opened a bureau in Pyongyang, the North's capital, in September 2016, Ed Jones (@edjonesafp), the agency's chief photographer in the Koreas based in Seoul, set out to focus in part on the ordinary lives at the center of it all.⠀ ⠀ Jones has been traveling to North Korea, which places severe restrictions on foreign media visiting the country, since 2012. Writing about the project previously, he noted: "initially we approached people who we felt were more likely to agree to have their photos taken, such as tour guides at the various monuments around Pyongyang that are easy to visit ... but we were quickly able to expand our approach to include others." Here, a selection of his portraits from this year.⠀ ⠀ Photographs by Ed Jones (@edjonesafp)—@afpphoto/@gettyimages

TIME Indonesian Acehnese men broke the national record on Aug. 13 for the l

  • 16.08.2017 03:31
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Indonesian Acehnese men broke the national record on Aug. 13 for the largest Saman dance performed simultaneously by men. More than 10,000 people turned up to the district of Gayo in Aceh to stage a record-breaking song and dance. Video source: AP

TIME A woman relaxes in Guam's Tumon Bay on Aug. 15. The American territory

  • 16.08.2017 02:12
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A woman relaxes in Guam's Tumon Bay on Aug. 15. The American territory has rocketed to international headlines in recent days amid rising U.S.-North Korea tensions after Pyongyang threatened a missile attack that would surround Guam in "enveloping fire." President Trump responded that the U.S. was "locked and loaded" should that plan be carried out. A South Korean news agency reported Tuesday that Kim had paused the plan to watch "stupid American behavior for a bit longer."⠀ ⠀ Photograph by Ed Jones (@edjonesafp)—@afpphoto/@gettyimages

TIME During remarks in the lobby of Trump Tower on Aug. 15, President Trump

Trump Tower New York

  • 16.08.2017 01:01
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During remarks in the lobby of Trump Tower on Aug. 15, President Trump said that anti-racism protesters who he called the "alt-left" bear some of the blame for the weekend unrest in #Charlottesville. "You had a group on one side that was bad and you had a group on the other side that was also very violent," he told the press. "There's blame on both sides." ⠀ ⠀ Tuesday's statement marked a return to his original, controversial comments on Saturday that "many sides" were responsible for the deadly clashes, during which a man believed to be a white supremacist drove his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, killing a woman. In his remarks on Monday that condemned the car-ramming, Trump had said "racism is evil."⠀ ⠀ Video source: Pool

TIME A huge Indian national flag is carried during Independence Day celebra

  • 15.08.2017 23:09
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A huge Indian national flag is carried during Independence Day celebrations in Ahmadabad on Aug. 15. Seven decades ago, India and Pakistan were carved from the former British Empire, triggering one of the largest human migrations in history. ⠀ ⠀ Photograph by Ajit Solanki—@ap.images

TIME A firefighter tries to extinguish a blaze near the Greek village of Ka

  • 15.08.2017 18:56
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A firefighter tries to extinguish a blaze near the Greek village of Kapandriti, north of Athens, on Aug. 14. A wildfire was raging on the coastal front of the city, officials said, with summer homes under threat and a local village evacuated. Photograph by Michalis Karagiannis—@afpphoto/@gettyimages

TIME A group of protesters in #Durham, N.C., pulled down a Confederate stat

Durham, North Carolina

  • 15.08.2017 06:57
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A group of protesters in #Durham, N.C., pulled down a Confederate statue on Aug. 14. A woman used a ladder to climb up the statue and tie a rope to it; others then pulled the rope, toppling the statue to the ground. The crowd was chanting phrases such as “We are the revolution” and “No KKK, no fascist USA.”⠀ ⠀ The Confederate Soldiers Monument was dedicated to the city in 1924 and stood outside a government building that houses offices such as the county manager and the county attorney. It depicts a soldier along with the words “In memory of the boys who wore the gray,” a reference to the Confederate forces during the Civil War. The monument also features a seal engraved with “The Confederate States of America.”⠀ ⠀ The toppling took place just two days after violence erupted in #Charlottesville, Va., when protesters clashed with white nationalists rallying against the removal of another Confederate statue.⠀ ⠀ Video source: Twitter/DerrickQLewis

TIME

Charlottesville, Virginia

  • 15.08.2017 03:06
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"It humbled me a whole lot, just seeing how a picture like that can reveal so much," said officer Darius Nash during an Aug. 14 portrait session with @ruddyroye in #Charlottesville. Two days earlier, a picture of Nash patrolling a KKK rally in July had found new online momentum as the Virginia college town erupted over a rally of white nationalists, neo-Nazis and Klansmen. The image was shared widely online, with some of those who did so appearing to think it was made that day.⠀ ⠀ In the uncomfortable haze of live breaking news it became the latest in a long line of photographs to be grabbed and shared without credit or context. Social networks are now minefields for information-gatherers. Photographers lose control of their work while those who rip and share it can reap the rewards: retweets, likes, followers. Images are separated from their intended meaning, and can even take on a new one. Nash, a school resource officer at Charlottesville High School, told Roye "it also brought my family closer in that they were able to see what I and other officers have to go through on a daily basis."⠀ ⠀ Read the full story about the viral photo and the search for the photographer on TIME.com.⠀ ⠀ Photograph by @ruddyroye for TIME

TIME The officer stands calmly as a group of white supremacists act out beh

Charlottesville, Virginia

  • 15.08.2017 01:04
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The officer stands calmly as a group of white supremacists act out behind him. The provocative scene one Saturday afternoon in #Charlottesville, shot with an iPhone, was shared online with a modest public following but would attract a wide audience. "A picture worth a thousand words," one commenter wrote on Aug. 12, 2017. "A black police officer protecting a group of men who wish him harm. Incredible,” wrote another, prefacing that remark with a question common during breaking news: “Who took this photo?” And when was it taken?⠀ ⠀ The picture went viral in recent days as the Virginia college town was rocked by unrest over the planned “Unite the Right” rally. As intense images emerged of the street clashes between white nationalists, neo-Nazis and Klansmen who faced off against counterprotesters, this one stood out. But as the retweets entered into the tens of thousands, doubts emerged that this image was from Saturday. In the uncomfortable haze of live breaking news it became the latest in a long line of images to be grabbed and shared online without credit or context.⠀ ⠀ And so began a search for the photographer, a hunt that started on Twitter and wound through Google, Reddit and Facebook until stopping on Instagram, where it appeared on the feed of Jill Mumie (@lil_mooms). That's where the story behind this photo begins.⠀ ⠀ Read an interview with the photographer and the officer in the picture on TIME.com.⠀ ⠀ Photograph by Jill Mumie (@lil_mooms)

TIME A member of the Syrian Democratic Forces keeps watch as he sits in fro

  • 14.08.2017 22:12
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A member of the Syrian Democratic Forces keeps watch as he sits in front of an Islamic State position in Raqqa, Syria, on Aug. 14, 2017. ⠀ ⠀ Photograph by Zohra Bensemra (@zohrabensemra)—@reuters